Warming Oceans

Unusual Warm Sea, Sharks & Otters

So the question is: Why have there been so many sightings outside late summer and early fall, the typical peak season for sharks?

The popular theory is that unseasonably warmer water has brought the change, but experts say it is much more complex than that.

Pacific West Coast Kelp Forests Vanishing

Veteran diver Steve Lackey, an instructor at Sub-Surface Progression Dive Shop in Fort Bragg, said, “I try not to be an alarmist, but it is pretty unprecedented, in my opinion.”

This time of year, he’s accustomed to seeing small sprouts of kelp begin to appear on the ocean floor, a harbinger of the spring and summer growing season. This year, there are none, he said.

“I don’t remember quite this clean, this kind of scoured rock, with hungry invertebrates,” he said.

West Coast Sardine Fishing Halted

Sardine stocks are at historic lows and might get worse, according to The Maritime Exclusive, “The sardine fishery closure is the second in as many years; it was closed mid-season last year due to low stocks, but it has since fallen further, and is expected to be down by 30 percent over last year by summer.”

Hot Ocean Temps Killing Fiji Fish

I had reports of this dead fish from all the way down next to Mango Bay resort, down by Namatakula all the way down to Malevu and im sure it went to the other side of Sigatoka as well.
According to Bonito, the fish kills began on Sunday and he estimates it will continue today because it is only a part of the larger problem of coral bleaching.

Oceans Warming at a “Quickening Rate”

“The findings are concerning. It’s clear evidence that the oceans are taking the brunt of the greenhouse gases and are accumulating a lot of heat. As for the ecological implications, that’s hard to say. There is a lot of life in the deep oceans and there’s lots we don’t know about the impact upon that life.”

The Sea & Climate Change

Tropical coral reefs cover less than 1% of the ocean, but they are home and nursery to 25% of all marine species; billions of fish, mollusks and other creatures rely on reefs for their food and shelter. Their wonder and beauty generates needed tourism dollars for many poor nations, and they act as natural barriers providing storm surge protection for many millions of coastal residents.

“Whole Ecosystem Change” in Pacific Ocean

“This El Nino is building up to be quite a doozy, but we also have a series of other changes going on,” said Steve Palumbi, director of the Hopkins Marine Station at Stanford University. “We are having changes in wind patterns, changes in upwellings along the coast. It’s like your whole basic ecosystem is being shifted around in different ways.”